Week 1-9: DACS tests and mastery testing for quarter one in math; American History = watching video about the creation of our Constitution and beginning our study of chapter 7 and the beginning of governing our new nation under the democracy created by our founding fathers; reading = treasure hunt novel project due for first quarter, DACS testing and launching our short story study procedures (story posters are our first step)
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Week 1-8 working on standards with lessons designed using DACs questions
http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_265_g_3_t_1.html?open=activities&from=search.html?qt=fractions
Models division of fractions well! Need to share with 7th and 8th to review our division of fractions skills. 7/5 divided by 1/3. How many 1/3's are in 7/5? This is what we need to ask!

Week 1-7: working on standards with lessons designed using DACs questions



WEEK 1-6
Math
Sept. 26 Monday
Tuesday
Sept. 27
Wednesday
Sept. 28
Thursday
Sept. 29
Vocabulary sheet goes to the forefront
Definitions for these vocabulary due tomorrow.

Discovering more about PI lab
Collect vocabulary



WEEK 1-6
Social Studies and Reading
Sept. 26
Monday
Sept. 27
Tuesday
Sept. 28
Wednesday
Sept. 29
Thursday
Medusa vocab project due.

Assign Vocab sentences/puzzle #6... due next Monday.

Reteach with team leaders for sec. 3 and 4 quizzes (make it a game of who can improve the most)

Go over chapter review assignment, along with Bunker Hill Group project and historical perspective
publishing newspaper

vote about group projects

Vocab sentences #5 due.
American Revolution Test
Reading Day: launch Treasure Hunt project and then DEAR for longer today!

WEEK 1-5 SEPTEMBER 19-20-21-22
AMERICAN HISTORY
Working on the following standards:Identify and explain the sources of conflict which led to theAmerican Revolution.Examples: Proclamation of 1763, Stamp Act, TownshendActs, Sugar Act, Coercive (Intolerable) Acts, tax on teaAssociate key individuals with their roles in the AmericanRevolution.Examples: John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, King George,Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, Samuel Adams, BenjaminFranklin.Explain the political significance of the Declaration ofIndependence.•Describe major military battles and the role of majorAmerican and British military leaders in the AmericanRevolution.Examples: Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, Yorktown,Bunker Hill, George Washington, Benedict Arnold, GeorgeRogers Clark, William Howe, John Burgoyne, CharlesCornwallis

  • RI.8.1. Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.8.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RI.8.3. Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories).

MONDAY From disc #2, go to power point for chapter four: show video “Being Able to Choose Your Own Government”, then students interact with the smart board for HISTORY CLOSE-UP, MAPS, AND IMAGES. Report rough drafts due today.
SCOPE Activity: theme-based lesson will take place during DEAR either today or tomorrow This project addresses: RL.8.9. Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new.

TUESDAY Vocabulary Puzzle 4 due for reading.
Quiz section 3 and 4. Do history/geography exercise together: “Early Battles Around Boston” Record on score checklist for each student as we complete tasks. Return quizzes and discuss how to remember the incorrect items. Work on reports. They are due tomorrow. Puzzle piece those items in our standards that we are expected to know about that are part of the melting pot that caused the Rev. War. (Create a cauldron to staple mini-reports on for visual aid.) Proclamation of 1763, Stamp Act, Townshend Acts, Sugar Act, Coercive (Intolerable) Acts, tax on tea, etc. and other events that fueled this war.

WEDNESDAY Review BIG IDEAS and vocabulary with power point on disc 2. Complete Skills activity: “Understanding Historical Interpretation” Assign chapter review copy and make it due Monday. Final drafts should be assembled and entered into newspaper copy. Print by tomorrow for students to have over the weekend! J

Next MONDAY- chapter review due and use for the Mindpoint Quiz Mindpoint Quiz ;
test by Wednesday and watch Constitution video in honor of the day that has passed that celebrates our Constitution
Focus in speaking/ writing due week 1-6 while beginning next chapter
READING THURSDAY. (Reading Class)
Read aloud responses from “The Tell-Tale Heart” activity and hand the project back to the students. The 13 points translated into 5 in the grade book… how does your grade look, students?
We will do reading class in the afternoon due to lab for math on Thursdays. Click on “Set Up for Short Story Assignments” on my wikispace under “Reading.” Choose story from anthology unit 1. Students must choose different stories. Short Story Project One due week 1-7. Treasure Hunt assignment: share with students and this project is due by the end of the quarter. Vocabulary Puzzle: assigned weekly on Mondays… due Thursdays. I can hand them out after lunch on Mondays. J
SL.8.5. Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. SHORT STORY PROJECTS DESIGNED TO MEET THIS STANDARD.
MATH 8 … Can 8th teach 6th grade about finding the area of a circle next week … week 1-6?
Monday- discuss “Forensic Investigation Practices” and Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard questions before puzzle work (DO THE DOWN PROBLEMS)
J-Lab time will be for spreadsheet assembly… plan for a cbm moment as well, so we can start plotting our correct number of digits. J
Puzzle 1: working with problems DOWN, students are assigned problems to solve and teach to the rest of the class Concepts explored: _ Austin DACS testing… Conference about DACS scores and hand out progress reports. J
Hand in: page p. 382-383
HOMEWORK: complete journal page (“Four Points of Interest”) and study fraction and the decimal expansion buddies… quiz daily until everyone has them committed to memory
TUESDAY Go over circumference and area of circles on p. 382 and 383, but also do Lab about “Discovering Pi” and use tracing paper… and notes from Geometry camp. How does the Circumference of a Circle Compare with its Diameter?
As needed, go back to circles that we drew and find the area of these circles that we designed. Revisit p. 398 volume of figures reinforced cubic centimeters as milliliters.
HOMEWORK: complete journal page and page 384 story problems about circumference and area…
WEDNESDAY Go over p. 384 and do p. 385 in class.
8.NS.1. Know that numbers that are not rational are called irrational. Understand informally that every number has a decimal expansion; for rational numbers show that the decimal expansion repeats eventually, and convert a decimal expansion which repeats eventually into a rational number.
Read aloud and explore more properties for algebra and move into discussing the different sets of numbers.
  • Copy into MATH TAB: 8.G.1. Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations:
  • a. Lines are taken to lines, and line segments to line segments of the same length.
  • b. Angles are taken to angles of the same measure.
  • c. Parallel lines are taken to parallel lines.
USE FACES FROM OUR VOLUME PROBLEMS TO CREATE 2-D SHAPES TO EXPERIMENT WITH.
Word Wall Wednesday: sign up, work on project for last 13 minutes of class
HOMEWORK: complete journal page and word wall project
(The above standard ties into the one we wrote last week, which we are still moving towards: 8.G.9. Know the formulas for the volumes of cones, cylinders, and spheres and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.)
THURSDAY AM MATH CLASS J-Lab time will be for spreadsheet assembly
Students who have their work done may get on J-Lab today and work on Mrs. Bodensteiner’s projects. If their name is on the board, they will not work on computer. J If there is time, targeted students need to meet with me as well: Ben and Tiki. Both working on prime factors and multiplying mixed numbers.
HOMEWORK: Creative ideas for teaching 6th grade area of CIRCLES
AND page 6/47 skills: prime factorization and operations with fractions/mixed #s





WEEK 1-4 SEPTEMBER 12-13-14-15
AMERICAN HISTORY
Working on the following standards:Identify and explain the sources of conflict which led to theAmerican Revolution.Examples: Proclamation of 1763, Stamp Act, TownshendActs, Sugar Act, Coercive (Intolerable) Acts, tax on teaAssociate key individuals with their roles in the AmericanRevolution.Examples: John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, King George,Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, Samuel Adams, BenjaminFranklin.Explain the political significance of the Declaration ofIndependence.•Describe major military battles and the role of majorAmerican and British military leaders in the AmericanRevolution.Examples: Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, Yorktown,Bunker Hill, George Washington, Benedict Arnold, GeorgeRogers Clark, William Howe, John Burgoyne, CharlesCornwallis

  • RI.8.1. Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.8.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RI.8.3. Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories).

MONDAY finish listening to section three and four as we read along for chapter 4 “The American Revolution”
TUESDAY section four still is being listened to for read aloud!
From disc #2, go to power point for chapter four: show video “Being Able to Choose Your Own Government”, then students interact with the smart board for HISTORY CLOSE-UP, MAPS, AND IMAGES. Next, quiz section 1 and 2. For bonus: write your own question with a blank in it and provide the answer. You could make up for any you might miss. You may write up to three bonus questions. Lastly, work on reports for the newspaper. Report rough drafts due Thursday.
WEDNESDAY Do history/geography exercise together: “Early Battles Around Boston” Record on score checklist for each student as we complete tasks. Return quizzes and discuss how to remember the incorrect items. Work on reports. They are due tomorrow. Puzzle piece those items in our standards that we are expected to know about that are part of the melting pot that caused the Rev. War. (Create a cauldron to staple mini-reports on for visual aid.) Proclamation of 1763, Stamp Act, Townshend Acts, Sugar Act, Coercive (Intolerable) Acts, tax on tea, etc. and other events that fueled this war.
Tentative NOTES: MONDAY Review BIG IDEAS and vocabulary with power point on disc 2. Quiz section 3 and 4. Complete Skills activity: “Understanding Historical Interpretation” Assign chapter review copy and make it due Monday.
TUESDAY- chapter review due and use for the Mindpoint Quiz Mindpoint Quiz ;
read out loud CLOSE topic from lesson plan… test by Thursday and reports in newspaper by Wednesday.
Focus in speaking/ writing due week 1-6 while beginning next chapter
READING THURSDAY. (Reading Class) We will do reading class in the afternoon due to lab for math on Thursdays. Click on “Set Up for Short Story Assignments” on my wikispace under “Reading.” Choose story from anthology unit 1. Students must choose different stories. Short Story Project One due week 1-7. Treasure Hunt assignment: share with students and this project is due by the end of the quarter. Vocabulary Puzzle: assigned weekly on Mondays… due Thursdays. I can hand them out after lunch on Mondays. J
SL.8.5. Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. SHORT STORY PROJECTS DESIGNED TO MEET THIS STANDARD.

MATH 8 … Can 8th teach 6th grade about finding the area of a circle next week … week 1-5?
Next Monday- discuss “Forensic Investigation Practices” and Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard questions before puzzle work
MONDAY Puzzle 1: working with problems ACROSS, students are assigned problems to solve and teach to the rest of the class Concepts explored: similar figures, factorial, estimating (7th grade actually had a debate during this class period about what is considered “close”), order of operations, relationships of vertices on a rectangle while plotted on the coordinate plane, chances of multiple events, and characteristics of a parallelogram
Go over page 4/45
HOMEWORK: complete journal page (“Four Points of Interest”)
TUESDAY Old Business: Puzzle One finish discussion, finish with skill pages: p. 43, 45
Copy into MATH TAB: 8.NS.1. Know that numbers that are not rational are called irrational. Understand informally that every number has a decimal expansion; for rational numbers show that the decimal expansion repeats eventually, and convert a decimal expansion which repeats eventually into a rational number.
Read aloud and explore more properties for algebra and move into discussing the different sets of numbers.
( The above standard ties into the one we wrote last week, which we are still moving towards: 8.G.9. Know the formulas for the volumes of cones, cylinders, and spheres and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.)
HOMEWORK: complete journal page
WEDNESDAY Lab: go back to circles that we drew and find the area of these circles that we designed. Revisit p. 398 volume of figures reinforced cubic centimeters as milliliters.
Word Wall Wednesday: sign up for vocabulary project and work on definitions for this unit
HOMEWORK: complete journal page and a day early p. 5/46
THURSDAY AM MATH CLASS Students who have their work done may get on J-Lab today and work on Mrs. Bodensteiner’s projects. If their name is on the board, they will not work on computer. Kayla need to DACS test. The other students need to conference about DACS scores. J If there is time, targeted students need to meet with me as well: Ben and Tiki. Both working on prime factors and multiplying mixed numbers.
HOMEWORK: review for teaching 6th grade area of circles… do p. 382-383 area and circumference of circles. Think about and record these questions and activity: How can we remember the algorithm for area of a circle? Circumference? Take a string and find the measure of the outside of a circle. What does C= (pi) times diameter have to do with that string?
Notes: Monday for homework assign DACS practice for data analysis and plan for 8th grade to come in and teach 6th grade.

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Our math classroom’s format meets the speaking/listening standards each week:

Comprehension and Collaboration

  • SL.8.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
  • Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
  • Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas.
  • Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence presented.
  • SL.8.2. Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation.
  • SL.8.3. Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

  • SL.8.4. Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
  • SL.8.5. Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest.
  • SL.8.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

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September 6 - 9, 2011 Week 1-3

Tuesday: 8th grade wears plaid for spirit week, Wednesday: Patriotic Day, Thursday: Wacky Attire Day, and

Friday: School Colors Day


AMERICAN HISTORY/READING Scroll down for the math assignments

Tuesday: finish recording the Big Ideas and our vocabulary list for our chapter 4 on the American Revolution

Wednesday and Thursday: listen to chapter 4 as you read along

Friday: math activity planned, so no reading or history today

Going to Custer for pep rally and parade for Homecoming/Spirit Week


Working on the following standards:

Identify and explain the sources of conflict which led to the
American Revolution.
Examples: Proclamation of 1763, Stamp Act, Townshend
Acts, Sugar Act, Coercive (Intolerable) Acts, tax on tea
Associate key individuals with their roles in the American
Revolution.
Examples: John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, King George,
Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, Samuel Adams, Benjamin
Franklin.
Explain the political significance of the Declaration of
Independence.
Describe major military battles and the role of major
American and British military leaders in the American
Revolution.
Examples: Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, Yorktown,
Bunker Hill, George Washington, Benedict Arnold, George
Rogers Clark, William Howe, John Burgoyne, Charles
Cornwallis

MATH

Tuesday: go over homework p. 2/43, 3/44

Record:
8.G.9. Know the formulas for the volumes of cones, cylinders, and spheres and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
Vocabulary for word wall: found in ch. 7 green 8th grade text (area and volume)

Homework: study guide about area and circumference of circles p. 382

Wednesday: go over p. 382 study guide

Do p. 383 practice for area and circumference

Homework: study guide p. 397 volume of prisms and cylinders; find a mug at home and figure out the volume and how many mL of liquid would fit inside your mug... bring it to school and share by Friday

Thursday: hand in study guide and continue with DACS testing

Friday: Do. p. 398 Volume of prisms and cylinders

Mug experiment

Homework: p. 4 and 45


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August 29-September 1, 2011 Week 1-2 Aims WEB and DACS testing
August 22-25, 2011 Week 1-1 Expectations and Welcome Back





external image Clipart---Mr.D---Math-Rocks2.jpg
external image Clipart---Mr.D---Math-Rocks2.jpg


Standards, Supporting Skills, and Examples
Indicator 1: Analyze the U.S historical eras to determine connections and cause/effect
relationships in reference to chronology.
Bloom’s Taxonomy
Level Standard, Supporting Skills, and Examples
(Analysis)
8.US.1.1. Students are able to relate events and outcomes of the
American Revolution to sources of conflict, roles of key
individuals and battles, and political documents.


Identify and explain the sources of conflict which led to the

American Revolution.
Examples: Proclamation of 1763, Stamp Act, Townshend
Acts, Sugar Act, Coercive (Intolerable) Acts, tax on tea


Associate key individuals with their roles in the American

Revolution.
Examples: John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, King George,
Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, Samuel Adams, Benjamin
Franklin.


Explain the political significance of the Declaration of

Independence.


Describe major military battles and the role of major

American and British military leaders in the American
Revolution.
Examples: Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, Yorktown,
Bunker Hill, George Washington, Benedict Arnold, George
Rogers Clark, William Howe, John Burgoyne, Charles
Cornwallis


(Comprehension)
8.US.1.2. Students are able to describe the unfolding of westward
expansion and reform movements in the United States.


Explain sequentially how and why the land was acquired and

settled.
Examples: Louisiana Purchase, Florida, Oregon, Texas
Examples: Texas Revolution, Mexican War, Cherokee
relocation, Seminole War


Describe the reform movement of the mid-nineteenth century

in the U.S.
Examples: women, slavery
(Comprehension)
8.US.1.3. Students are able to describe the sources of conflict, key
individuals, battles, and political documents of the Civil War
period.


Outline the major sources of conflict.

Example: political, geographical, and economic differences


Identify key individuals and explain their roles in the Civil

War.
Examples: Daniel Webster, John C. Calhoun, Abraham
Lincoln, John Brown, Jefferson Davis, Stephen Douglas,
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant


Describe major military battles and campaigns.

Examples: Bull Run, Gettysburg, Antietam, Vicksburg,
Shiloh


Associate significant political documents and speeches with

events.
Examples: Gettysburg Address, Emancipation Proclamation
(Comprehension)
8.US.1.4. Students are able to summarize the political and social
changes in the United States during Reconstruction.


Outline the political effects of Reconstruction in the United

States.
Examples: Freedmen’s Bureau, Jim Crow laws,